Tag Archives: Gum Disease

Osteoporosis and Bisphosphonates – Bone Loss is Not Your Only Concern

Oral health is not commonly found in the forefront of everyone’s mind when we think of osteoporosis. For those at risk for osteoporosis, it should be something you not only discuss with your doctor but your dentist as well. Loss of bone in the mouth leads to loss of teeth, which makes it more difficult to properly nourish your body. There are many treatments used to address osteoporosis, but some such as Bisphosphonates severely impact you mouth. Bisphosphonates, such as Fosamax, Boniva, Actonel, and Reclast place a person at risk of developing osteonecrosis of the jaw which means a person’s gum tissue is not fully covering the bone leaving it exposed to the oral environment. This condition is difficult to treat, so if you need to be placed on Bisphosphonate treatment it would be best to see your dentist beforehand to make sure there are not any compromised teeth or teeth that need to be removed. The trauma associated with tooth extraction combined with use of bisphosphonates can lead you down the path of non-vital bone. While the exact cause is unknown, it is thought to be due to possible infection, the jaw’s limited ability to repair itself, or decreased vascularity of the jaw. Bisphosphonates reduce your bone’s ability to turn over so the constant production of bone reduces the blood supply due to the increased bone density. Recently it has been noted that use of bisphosphonates may increase a person’s risk of dental implant failure. A study conducted at the New York College of Dentistry found that women with dental implant failure were about 3 time more likely if they were taking oral bisphosphonates. Managing osteoporosis is a team effort and you should be seen by your dentist on a regular basis to preserve your oral health.

For More Information:

Implant failure may be related to bisphosphonate use

Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ)

Weight Loss Could be Good for Your Oral Health

Those of you that have a resolution to lose weight, you will be benefiting your oral health as well. Check it out! http://goo.gl/MDnzt

Not all Candy is Created Equal : Sweet vs Sour

 We all know that something sticky and sweet is not a treat, well now we can add sour candy to that list. During our daily battle to improve our population’s dental health, we advise our patients to avoid various foods or treats that can have a negative impact on their dental health. In the midst of one such day, I stumbled upon an article that mentioned sour candies containing the up to a 92% greater potential to erode enamel and initiate tooth decay, than the original flavor counterpart (1). The main source of this increased risk is due to the greater amount of dietary acids such as citric acid, malic acid, and fumaric acid found in the candy. Citric acid seems to be the most commonly used acid not only in candy, but other foods and drinks that line our store shelves.

As we go through our day our busy day, the pH of our mouth fluctuates from a safe level (teeth recalcify) to a harmful acidic level (calcium is lost and tooth decay starts) every time we eat. If we are constantly snacking on candy or other foods our mouth is not given the chance to come back to the safe pH. If these snacks contain citric acid it makes maintaining your dental health a greater battle. If you need something in your mouth a sugarless gum is best because it keeps your acid fighting salivary glands stimulated. Also, snacks consisting of foods such as cheeses or walnuts can be less detrimental to your dental health.

Dental Health Tips:

1. Brush and Floss your teeth at least twice a day if not after every meal.

2. Do your best to avoid citric acid and other dietary acids in your diet.

3. Chew a sugarless gum, preferably containing Xylitol, usually a mint variety, since the fruit gums typically incorporate citric acid. Two things occur when you chew gum; saliva flow is stimulated by the gum (aiding in the buffering of acids), and the gum helps flush saliva between your teeth (aiding in bringing the pH between your teeth to a basic level that takes less time in other places in your mouth).

4. Stay hydrated with water so your salivary glands can produce plenty of saliva. Though it is good to dilute the acid by drinking water, keeping water in your mouth can increase the risk by diluting and washing away the calcium and proteins in your saliva that buffer the acids.

5.Visit your Dentist regularly so that your risk of dental decay can be monitored and any areas of dental decay can be addressed while the cavity is still small so we can save healthy tooth structure. 

Sources:

  1. Sour Worse Than Sweet for Your Teeth
  2. Journal of the American Dental Association

So you think, “It’s Just a Teeth Cleaning”

Gum Disease only effects your mouth???
Research into the relationship between oral health and systemic disease is currently uncovering greater and more diverse connections between the afflictions of the human body and maladies of the mouth. Papers are constantly being published noting connection between oral health and systemic health including the oral precursors to variety of cancers ie, throat and pancreatic cancers. The presence of certain bacteria in saliva and dental plaque, has been linked to chronic pancreatitis the precurser to pancreatic cancer in otherwise normal patients. It has been noted that dental care received by women in the early menopause may be able to reduce their risk of heart disease and other disease symptoms such as burning mouth syndrome. Periodontal disease has been linked to an increased risk of upper respiratory infections and poor cardiovascular health. We are moving from a time where people thought that their mouth was separate from the rest of their body to a time where our dental health is a window into our overall health. The conclusion: the level of health of our bodies can be assessed by examining the health of our mouths. It is not just a teeth cleaning, it is the beginning therapy to a healthy vital body and mind.

Need for a Dental Hygienist
There are many nooks and crannies in our mouth that can be difficult to keep clean with regular brushing and flossing. As a result dental plaque builds up around teeth. Over time the calcium in our saliva will mix with the multiple layers of dental plaque and form dental calculus (tartar). As dental calculus builds up, it not only provides a surface to collect more bacteria that can weaken teeth and lead to decay, but it creates a constant irritation, both chemical and physical, to the gum tissue and leads to gum disease. When a person has a teeth cleaning any dental calculus that has built up is removed and the teeth are polished. Having smooth polished teeth will reduce your vulnerability to gum disease and benefit your overall health and quality of life. How frequently a person requires a thorough teeth cleaning relates to their severity of gum disease.

Progression of Gum Disease from Gingivitis to Periodontal Disease
Leaving dental plaque along the gum line causes the gums to become red and inflamed which is the first stage of gum disease (gingivitis). This inflammation is your body’s best effort to fight oral bacteria. When dental plaque is not effectively removed it becomes fixed to the teeth as dental calculus, it can only be completely removed by a professional such as a dental hygienist or a dentist. Swelling of your gums will get to the point that your tooth brush will not reach far enough below the gum line allowing the dental calculus continue down your root. Left untreated the gingivitis will progress to periodontal disease. Periodontal disease begins when inflammation catalyzes the break down of the bone and ligaments supporting the teeth. A routine teeth cleaning by your dental hygienist is not effective at this point, you require a deep cleaning (scaling and root planing) to return your mouth to health (severe disease may require more extensive treatment). A routine maintenance performed by your dental hygienist or dentist needs to be set up to avoid a progression in periodontal disease. A dentist or dental hygienist, when seen regularly, can spot the warning signs of medical issues to come. It is not just a teeth cleaning, it is the beginning therapy to a healthy vital body and mind.

More information can be found at:                                                           Medical News Today & Inside Dentistry