Osteoporosis and Bisphosphonates – Bone Loss is Not Your Only Concern

Oral health is not commonly found in the forefront of everyone’s mind when we think of osteoporosis. For those at risk for osteoporosis, it should be something you not only discuss with your doctor but your dentist as well. Loss of bone in the mouth leads to loss of teeth, which makes it more difficult to properly nourish your body. There are many treatments used to address osteoporosis, but some such as Bisphosphonates severely impact you mouth. Bisphosphonates, such as Fosamax, Boniva, Actonel, and Reclast place a person at risk of developing osteonecrosis of the jaw which means a person’s gum tissue is not fully covering the bone leaving it exposed to the oral environment. This condition is difficult to treat, so if you need to be placed on Bisphosphonate treatment it would be best to see your dentist beforehand to make sure there are not any compromised teeth or teeth that need to be removed. The trauma associated with tooth extraction combined with use of bisphosphonates can lead you down the path of non-vital bone. While the exact cause is unknown, it is thought to be due to possible infection, the jaw’s limited ability to repair itself, or decreased vascularity of the jaw. Bisphosphonates reduce your bone’s ability to turn over so the constant production of bone reduces the blood supply due to the increased bone density. Recently it has been noted that use of bisphosphonates may increase a person’s risk of dental implant failure. A study conducted at the New York College of Dentistry found that women with dental implant failure were about 3 time more likely if they were taking oral bisphosphonates. Managing osteoporosis is a team effort and you should be seen by your dentist on a regular basis to preserve your oral health.

For More Information:

Implant failure may be related to bisphosphonate use

Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ)

2 responses to “Osteoporosis and Bisphosphonates – Bone Loss is Not Your Only Concern

  1. The Osteoporosis prevention is on our hands:
    Three factors essential for keeping your bones healthy throughout your life are:

    Adequate amounts of calcium
    Adequate amounts of vitamin D
    Regular exercise
    Calcium
    Men and women between the ages of 18 and 50 need 1,000 milligrams of calcium a day. This daily amount increases to 1,200 milligrams when women turn 50 and men turn 70. Good sources of calcium include:

    Low-fat dairy products
    Dark green leafy vegetables
    Canned salmon or sardines with bones
    Soy products, such as tofu
    Calcium-fortified cereals and orange juice
    If you find it difficult to get enough calcium from your diet, consider taking calcium supplements. The Institute of Medicine recommends taking no more than 2,000 to 2,500 milligrams of calcium daily.

    Vitamin D
    Vitamin D is necessary for your body to absorb calcium. Many people get adequate amounts of vitamin D from sunlight, but this may not be a good source if you live in high latitudes, if you’re housebound, or if you regularly use sunscreen or you avoid the sun entirely because of the risk of skin cancer.

    Scientists don’t yet know the optimal daily dose of vitamin D. A good starting point for adults is 600 to 800 international units (IU) a day, through food or supplements. If your blood levels of vitamin D are low, your doctor may suggest higher doses. Teens and adults can safely take up to 4,000 international units (IU) a day.

    Exercise
    Exercise can help you build strong bones and slow bone loss. Exercise will benefit your bones no matter when you start, but you’ll gain the most benefits if you start exercising regularly when you’re young and continue to exercise throughout your life.

    Combine strength training exercises with weight-bearing exercises. Strength training helps strengthen muscles and bones in your arms and upper spine, and weight-bearing exercises — such as walking, jogging, running, stair climbing, skipping rope, skiing and impact-producing sports — mainly affect the bones in your legs, hips and lower spine.

    Swimming, cycling and exercising on machines such as elliptical trainers can provide a good cardiovascular workout, but because such exercises are low impact, they’re not as helpful for improving bone health as weight-bearing exercises are.

    more: http://alturl.com/e99ba

  2. About 18 million Americans have osteopenia. Osteopenia refers to early signs of bone loss that can turn into osteoporosis. With osteopenia, bone mineral density is lower than normal. However, it is not yet low enough to be considered osteoporosis.”

    View the most interesting blog post on our very own blog site
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